Best Practices for Writing an Executive Summary

The executive summary is a concise overview of the proposal that should touch on all of the key themes of greatest interest to the funder.  In some cases, the executive summary may be the only section of the proposal some evaluators will read. Some of the choices you'll need to consider around the crafting of an executive summary include when to write it, what content to include, and how to work within page limits for maximum impact. 

 
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How Nonprofits Can Be Innovative without Changing What Works

How can you be innovative enough to keep the grant money flowing without changing your tried 'n true approaches to core services?

One approach is to innovate around what's working. If your programs are effective, maybe you can bring innovation to the operations side and how you manage your programs. If your organization has strong service delivery programs and program management infrastructure, perhaps there are opportunities to be innovative in the way you approach the sustainability of your programs and services.

 
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Tips for Creating an Organizational Chart for a Grant Proposal

An organizational chart can show two things. First, it can be an easy, visual way of showing reporting lines, or who is reporting to whom. Second, organizational charts can show communication lines, or who is communicating with whom, including who will be communicating to the donor. Although frequently included as part of a proposal's annex, organizational charts can also be included in the body of the grant proposal as part of the management section. Organizational charts can range from basic to elaborate depending on the needs of the proposal and the limits on your budget. Below are a three options for creating organizational charts.

 
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Conferences & Events of Interest to the Nonprofit Community: October - November 2016

Below you'll find nine conferences scheduled for October and November 2016. Except for the International Fundraising Congress, all of the conferences listed below will take place in the U.S. This fall it's an East Coast line-up with several of the conferences taking place in the Washington DC area and two in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 
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Four Strategies for Managing Multiple Writers

Even for a "simple" proposal, there will be multiple people contributing to the different pieces, with some working on the budget, others writing the more technical pieces, and still others wrangling together the supporting materials. If you are lucky, you'll also have an editor on your team who can copyedit the proposal at the final stage. Below are four things you can do to make the proposal process easier when there are several writers involved:

 
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Preparing for a Government Funding Opportunity

Foundation grants often have known release dates and established program areas, which mean there are few surprises: You can find out when the foundation accepts proposals, and you can usually read up on the program areas and past grantees on the foundation's website. You may even be able to access the grant application well in advance of the time applications are due if the foundation uses a standard application format.

Government grant opportunities are different. For many government funding opportunities, the agency that will release the funding announcement doesn't have direct control over all the variables including how much money a grant will award and even when the opportunity announcement will be published.

 
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Setting Yourself Up to Win a Foundation Grant before the Funding Opportunity Comes Out

How do you start work on a proposal opportunity that hasn't been announced yet? There is a two-part answer. Your approach will depend on whether you are interested in foundation funding or government grants. This post will focus on preparing for foundation grants. A follow-up post will discuss preparing for government grants.

 
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Tips for Finding Foundation Grants to Support Research

The largest funders of research are government agencies, but private and corporate foundations also fund research. Although grants awarded by foundations are usually smaller than those awarded by government agencies, foundation grants are almost always easier to apply to leading to lower opportunity costs.Research grants from foundations, similar to those from government agencies, can target either individuals or institutions.

 
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